Tag Archives: Peel Here

Wax Paper Pop Art #16: Bubble gum? These should have come with Reese’s Pieces…

To cap off the E.T. theme this week, here’s a better look at the wax wrapper from that Buster Browns shoe ad I shared on Tuesday.

E.T Topps bubblegum cards, circa 1982.

Wax Paper Pop Art #15: Trippin’ through Ohio with the McDonaldland Gang!

To sort of keep this week’s McDonalds posts going I thought I’d take a minute to share some awesome trading cards from the impressive collection of the one and only Brandon of the Waffle Whiffer Zone.  Brandon’s site and Flickr feed have been a constant source of inspiration on Branded for the last four years and change.

Since I haven’t been able to find a physical example of any McDonald’s branded wax packages, I figured the next best thing would be to take a look at some trading cards the company produced in Cleveland, Ohio back in 1974.  These promo cards are all themed with specific iconography of the area including the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (behind Grimace), Hale Farm & Western Reserve Village in Bath, Ohio in Summit County (behind Mayor McCheese), the Cleveland Health Museum and Education Center (behind Officer Big Mac), the Great Lakes Historical Society Museum in Vermilion (behind Captain Crook), the Cleveland Zoo in Brookside Park (behind Ronald McDonald), and the Blossom Music Center, located between Cleveland and Akron (behind a very laid back Hamburglar.)

       

One of the things that I love about these cards is that the art is so simplified and interesting.  It’s the same aesthetic that draws me to bubblegum card wax package art. It’s much better than the art in that 1980 Calendar I shared on Monday too.

       

       

Heartfelt thanks go out to Brandon for letting me use the images from his Flickr feed.  You should definitely take a moment and visit him at his site, Waffle Whiffer Zone for some amazing nostalgic ephemera…

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Wax Paper Pop Art #14: We named the dog Indiana…

Today on Wax Paper Pop Art, Indiana Jones.  The first wrapper is a little boring, if only because Topps/O-Pee-Chee used a glorified photocop in the artwork instead of loosely re-drawing the image.  I’m much more interested in the crude, simplistic renderings with these wrappers, or at least re-drawn images.  Photo quality is just sort of lifeless…

Raiders of the Lost Ark from Topps (O-Pee-Chee in Canada), 1981.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom from Topps, 1984.  I talked about the stickers here.

Wax Paper Pop Art #13: Coming back for seconds…

This wrapper reminds me that there are still a few sets of sticker cards I still need.  Also, this is an example of a Canadian Topps wrapper which is distributed under the name O-Pee-Chee.

Jaws 2 from Topps (O-Pee-Chee in Canada), 1978.

Wax Paper Pop Art #12: One of the best looking mustaches in the business…

I’ve been falling in love with the USA network show Burn notice recently, and it’s got me thinking about all the tropes that make for a great one-and-done hour-long action shows.  And this got me thinking about Tom Selleck and his sweet ride.  So here you go…

Magnum P.I. Bubblegum Cards from Donruss, 1983.

Wax Paper Pop Art #11: Of black gloves and blonde nightsticks…

Can you hear the theme music?  I can.  And now I’m going to try and stop an out-of-control Winnebago that has an illegal poker game inside.  Or do I tackle that out-of-control go-cart with the wind-surfing sail attached?  Damnit, there’s also some unruly skateboarders tearing up the local sidewalks!  Of course Elvira is also in town, so there’s that too.  A CHiPie’s job is never done…

CHiPs Sticker Cards from Donruss, 1979 (which you can see here.)

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Wax Paper Pop Art #10: Before the WWF was pissing off panda enthusiasts…

Today’s waxy pop art comes from the 1985 Topps Pro Wrestling card set (which I’ve yet to procure any stickers for sadly.)

Peel Here #105: Rescued from 23 years of un-love!

The wife and I were browsing one of our local antique malls recently when I stumbled on a new booth with a couple bins of ephemera.  I usually strike out when I find stacks of magazines and paper as the stuff I’m interested in, kids stuff mostly, just doesn’t seem to register as profitable.   But something caught my eye that got me to stop, a bit of Mylar sticking out from the stack that looked really familiar.  Sure enough, it was the outer packaging of a sticker collecting set put out by Diamond back in 1987.  This particular set contained a G.I. Joe sticker collector album and ten packs of stickers…

I’ve talked about this fad before with a set of Jem, Hulk Hogan’s Rock ‘n’ Wrestling, and the Filmation Ghostbusters stickers, but basically in the late 70s through the early 90s there were a handful of companies (the main one is called Panini) producing sticker collecting sets that took a cue from the excitement surrounding baseball and bubblegum cards.  Instead of releasing sheets of all purpose stickers, companies like Panini and Diamond would put together mini collector albums, these magazine-like books that you’d fill with specific stickers to illustrate a story or to fill out sports team rosters.  The hobby is mainly a European one which is still going strong today.  I haven’t really seen is stateside since the 90s though.

  

What’s a little sad is that while inspecting the set I noticed that there was a little piece of wrapping paper tapes to the back.  This had been intended as a Christmas present for someone back in 1987 and it was never opened.  For 23 years this sticker set has been laying around unloved, and I planned on righting that wrong.  I never had the G.I. Joe set growing up (I only had a handful of Topps branded baseball sets and the Transformers the Movie set), so I was really excited to get this home and see what was inside…

My biggest fear was that the stickers wouldn’t stick to the pages after all this time.  Of all the stickers in my collection, there are only a handful that could probably still be used as intended.  Most, including just about all of the Topps, Donruss, and Fleer sticker cards have bonded semi-permanently with their backing, and even if they can be peeled up, they just don’t have any stick left in them.  With a sticker book like this it would be a shame if they didn’t work anymore, but my fears were assuaged.  The stickers stuck just fine!

One of the things that I love about this set is that it featured a bunch of stickers which utilized the packaging art from the figures.  I love this art and it’s really cool to finally get a hold of some for characters that I hadn’t seen in years like Chuckles and Jinx.  I only managed to get 4 of these pieces in the 10 packs which is kind of a shame.  It makes me want to rush over to eBay and see if I can’t complete this set…

   

These album sets were also fun because they typically featured some sort of activities on the pages to go along with the story and the stickers.  The gimmicks in this set are hidden printing on the pages, much like the McDonald’s calendar I shared a while ago.  The set comes with a little red cellophane decoder screen that filters out the obscuring red ink overlays to reveal secret messages, character file-card info, and the answers to puzzles.  Below you can get an idea of what these games were like with the mismatched hats of the following four Joe team members (which I’ve digitally un-obscured with the modern magic of Photoshop…)

It’s also kind of neat that Diamond took the time to print out the sticker images on the majority of the spots where the actual stickers are supposed to be applied so that kids who couldn’t track them all down had a chance to more or less follow along with the story (again with their trusty decoder strip.)  The one time when they refrained from this was with the images that required multiple stickers to complete.  These are considered top secret, which is also kind of neat as it enhances the collectability factor.  I know I always relished the feeling of completing a four-sticker image.  The artwork in the album is pretty decent as well (even though the cover of the book is kind of fugly.)  In particular I really dug this hidden image of Zartan posing as a government agent.

Again, through the magic of Photoshop we can see both images clearly probably for the first time in 23 years…

  

My favorite piece of art by far is on the back cover.  It features a bunch of the season two (of the cartoon series) Joes as well as a kid with a walking stick against going into battle against a single B.A.T. and a bunch of Crimson Guard soldiers.  The painting also features a rare moment where Lifeline, the medic in red at the front of the charge, is strapped.  Odd considering the character is a pacifist and all…

I also thought it was interesting that the company featured a sticker trading policy where anyone could trade any two doubles for a specific sticker they desired.  I wonder how many kids took advantage of this service?

If nothing else, I had a lot of fun peeling these stickers and placing them in the collector’s album.  Even if it sat for 23 years, this book finally got some of the love it deserved!

Wax Paper Pop Art #9: That’s one primary-colored Knight Rider…

I wonder why the person in charge of picking the colors for this 1982 Donruss Knight Rider wax pack didn’t think to switch out the red and blue of Michael’s shirt and jacket to get it a bit more accurate to the show?  Anyway, I wish these cards had a sticker card subset, but alas, they didn’t…

Wax Paper Pop Art #8: 3-Color Dukes edition…

Speaking of the Orange, Blue, Yellow combo, here’s a couple of other wax wrappers that hit this in a slightly different way…

 

Dukes of Hazzard (Donruss, 1980)

 

Dukes of Hazzard, Design #2 (Donruss, 1980)