Rekindling the Awesome 80s Kid Adventure Genre

As a kid in the 80s there was a sub-genre of movies, books and TV that I was addicted to focusing on kid adventurers.  I think these stories really struck a nerve with me because I could identify with the characters so closely.  They didn’t have super powers, weren’t typically super well off, and yet they all had a thirst for discovery, exploration and adventure that led them to unlocking mysteries, fighting against villains and monsters, and basically becoming heroes.  You see this in movies like the Goonies, Monster Squad, the Explorers, E.T. and Stand By Me, books like the Choose Your Own Adventure or the Samantha Slade: Monster Sitter series, and TV shows like Whiz Kids and Voyagers.  Though the genre has persisted through the 90s and on to today the tone has shifted dramatically and these days to a point where these kid characters are either super powered themselves or live in a world so unrelateable that it doesn’t feel that the kid audience could ever stumble into the same story (I’m looking at you Hunger Games, Maze Runner, Harry Potter, et al.)

So, when my artist friend Scott Serkland reached out to me about his new comic book Young and the Dead I was super stoked to see what he has in store!  Set in the 80s, the story follows a group of neighborhood kids who find themselves in the middle of the zombie apocalypse. From the kickstarter page:

Young and the Dead follows the adventures of 11-year-old Sam Young and his little brother Tad, who wake up one morning to find that most of the adults in their quiet suburban neighborhood have fallen victim to a nasty virus that has transformed them into flesh eating zombies. Together, with a rag-tag team of neighborhood misfits: Sam’s wisecracking best friend Mitch, a live action role-play aficionado named Lloyd, a tough as nails tomboy named Oxsana, Sam’s secret crush Stephanie, and her overprotective older brother Ricardo, aka Rocky. It’s a race against time as these unlikely heroes fight to survive and unlock the clues to a cure that could possibly reverse the effects of the deadly zombie outbreak and save the world in the process.

Young in the Dead is an homage to all the great kid-centric adventure films of the 1980’s. Films like The Goonies, Monster Squad, Explorers, and ET The Extra Terrestrial, to name a few. Think Goonies meets Night of the Living Dead. Young and the Dead combines 80’s nostalgia, adventure, humor, horror, mystery, and danger, and throws in a healthy helping of zombies (You all remember the zombie apocalypse of the 1980s, right?) There will be thrills, chills, and guts will spill (mostly zombie guts)!”

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I’ve been a fan of Scott’s artwork for years and it’s really awesome to see him branching out into sequential storytelling. He has a really great design aesthetic that bleeds out of his art and into his presentation at conventions and appearances.  I mean take a look at his setup!

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I’ve gotten a chance to read the first two issues and I fell head over heels for the story.  I love Scott’s attention to detail and his take on these kids coming from some semi-broken homes.

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He also has a great sense of whimsy, yet when it comes to bringing the violence and gore of the zombie horror he pulls no punches!

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All in all, I think fans of 80s nostalgia, horror and most importantly the kid adventure genre will really dig Scotts new comic.  You can find the project over on kickstarter where he’s making the story available in a number of formats with a lot of cool perks and add-ons.  In particular I’m hoping that the project reaches the Trading Card stretch goal as I’d love to see some Young and the Dead wax packs!

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So again, if you dig horror, the 80s or kid adventure, take a moment to head over to the funding page, watch Scott’s introduction video and consider backing the project.  I know I did…

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Weird Collectables, or the Most Awesome Swatch of Wallpaper Ever…

Considering the rant-ish piece I wrote last week about the exclusivity of the upcoming Mondo Monster Squad “Rock Until You Drop” vinyl singles, I thought it would behoove me to switch gears from focusing on that sort of manufactured collectible to a much more organic and meaningful piece that I was privileged to put in my personal collection recently.

A couple of months ago I was surprised with one of the weirdest yet coolest gifts that I’ve ever received, and it touched me so deeply that I actually shed a few tears when I realized what I was holding in my hand.  I had been contacted by a really kind former crew member (Jim Clarke) who had worked on one of my favorite childhood television shows, You Can’t Do That on Television.  Apparently he’d read and dug a couple of the pieces I’d written that surrounded the show here at Branded (a review of the You Can’t Do That On Film documentary and the Slimed book), and had mentioned that he wanted to send me a piece of ephemera for my collection.  A couple of weeks went by and with a ton of crazy things going on behind the scenes of Branded I let this exchange slip from my mind a bit until I received a small envelope in the mail with a Canadian postal return address.

As I carefully opened the package I was trying to guess at what the contents might be.  Mr. Clarke was purposely vague as to what he was sending, and I’m glad he was.  The packaged contained a folded letter on official CTV letterhead and a swatch of blue and green flowered wallpaper.  For a second I was confused, and then it dawned on me that I was holding a very small and very awesome piece of the You Can’t Do That On Television filming set!  This was a piece of wallpaper that adorned the walls of the main family living room set where Les Lye’s Lance Prevert and Abby Hagyard’s Mom character cracked wise with dozens of kid actors during the 80s and early 90s.  I mean, holy crap, if this piece of wallpaper could talk.

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You Can’t Do That On Television was such a huge show for me.  Not only was it the cornerstone show of a network that I watched all the time as a kid and teen, but it was my first real introduction to sketch comedy.  YCDTOTV was my gateway to shows like Monty Python, SCTV, Kids in the Hall and the Upright Citizens Brigade.  That style of comedy is what kept me sane as an overweight, geeky teenager, and I can’t even count how often my mind would drift back to the dozen characters Les Lye played when I was struggling to fit in at school and with friends.  Those characters were the backbone of my inner monologue comedy, and they shaped me as a person to an extent.  So to have a piece, even something as small and insignificant as a piece of wallpaper from that show is almost like having a magic talisman.

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Never in a million years did I ever think I’d own and cherish a small patch of wallpaper, a piece of wallpaper that I’m totally going to frame and hang proudly in Branded HQ.  This just reinforces the idea that maybe, instead of dropping a ton of cash on eBay for nostalgic toys or cool new manufactured collectibles, maybe it’s better to put out as much positive energy out into the void as possible and then let the universe return the favor.  I’m not a super spiritual individual, but I do know that the things that I cherish the most, collection-wise, is stuff that has come my way through connections I’ve made because of writing and podcasting here at Branded in the 80s.  I’ve had the honor to meet (online and in person) some amazingly friendly and talented people that I never would have met had I not started this project, and the gifts, trades and purchases are the things that truly make my heart swell.

I can’t thank Jim Clarke enough for reaching out like he did and helping to keep the flame of You Can’t Do That On Television alive.  Clarke is one of the few people who was forward thinking enough to save some of the sets and props from the show.  In addition to saving some of the wallpaper from the living room set, Clarke also owns the wooden post from the firing squad set, the microphone Les Lye’s announcer character used, and the freaking lockers from the mid-show joke segments!  How cool is that?  You can check out an interview with him here.

What’s the weirdest/coolest piece in your nostalgia collection?

Exclusivity Vs. Fandom, or Why it Sucks to be a Collector These Days *UPDATED*

I’ve mentioned this in the past, but it bears repeating, I don’t like being negative here at Branded in the 80s.  First and foremost this site is about celebrating the nostalgia of the 80s and all of the cool stuff that goes along with loving that decade.  But I’m human and just like everyone else there is some stuff that just really grinds my gears.  Typically when there’s something that really gets on my nerves I’ll force my better half to listen to me gripe about it for a few days, then I’ll focus on something positive and just get over it.  But every once in awhile I just want to get all my thoughts out on paper (so to speak) and process the negativity in a slightly more productive manner.  Can I get a decent article or editorial out of it?  Well, let’s see.

This past week one of my favorite movies of all time, the Monster Squad, was suddenly trending in the news due to the announcement that Mondo would be releasing the film’s soundtrack on vinyl this October.  To get people excited for that release the company decided to also release a vinyl single this May featuring the two pop songs from the film, Michael Sembello’s “Rock Until You Drop” and the end credits “Monster Squad Rap”.  Frankly, this is outstanding news as I’ve been dying for the soundtrack and score on vinyl for years.  La-La Land Records had just recently released the Bruce Broughton score on CD (and it sounds amazing), but I was really hoping for a nice piece of artistic vinyl, something that I could put out and display.

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So, considering this awesome news, why am I so bummed?  Well, the Mondo single release is going to be made available in four variant editions, each featuring beautiful sleeve artwork by some really swell artists and different colored vinyl pressings.  The releases include artwork by Gary Pullin, Randy Ortiz, Jason Edmiston, and the folks at Phantom City Creative (the latter two I featured during my Month of the Monster Squad a couple years ago.)  Here’s a look at the four release variants…

Dracula cover with art by Phantom City Creative

Dracula cover with art by Phantom City Creative

Wolfman cover with art by Gary Pullin

Wolfman cover with art by Gary Pullin

Frankenstein cover with art by Jason Edmiston

Frankenstein cover with art by Jason Edmiston

Gillman cover with art by Randy Ortiz

Gillman cover with art by Randy Ortiz

Alright, amazing cover at and super cool colored vinyl, so far so good.  While I’m not crazy about variants and the thought of paying for the same two songs four times, that’s totally something I’m willing to do as a huge fan of the Monster Squad.  So what’s my problem?  Well, two of these variants are going to be exclusives.  Actually technically three of these are exclusives, I just happen to live in an area where one of them will be readily available.  The Gary Pullin Wolfman variant will be exclusively available at Texas Frightmare starting this weekend and the Ortiz Gillman edition will only be available in record stores in the UK in May.  The Edmiston Frankenstein edition is going to be exclusively sold in record stores in the US in May, and the PCC Dracula version will be sold online at the Mondo site also starting in May.  So, for Monster Squad fans like me living outside of Texas in the US the Wolfman and Gillman editions are going to be a bit tricky to get our hands on.

Though record stores in the UK will be offering copies of the Gillman pressing for sale online (for instance Transmission Records and Norman Records), I’ve been hearing that they will be refusing or refunding orders coming in from the US to keep the European exclusivity intact.  This is frankly (excuse my french), frustrating as shit.  On the one hand I applaud the convictions of these record store owners for sticking to their guns, but on the other I just want to give them my money in return for a product they are selling that I really want to buy.  Similarly, with the Pullin variant, from what I understand you have to attend Texas Frightmare in order to get a copy.  So, I live roughly 1,400 miles from Dallas, TX and had pretty much zero chance of making it out to the show this weekend.  If I want to snag a copy of that disc I have to crowd-source my shopping list and hope that I’ve made a contact on one of the social media channels I frequent who might be going to the show.  I also have to hope that they don’t mind standing in line for me, hauling the record around all day, and then taking the time to ship it to me after the show.  I’ve met a bunch of super gracious folks who have done similar “muleing” for me in the past, but I hate asking this of people every time there’s some exclusive I want at a show I just can’t get to.

Exclusivity.  I’ll be honest, the whole concept just baffles and enrages me.  It’s not that I feel a sense of entitlement or that I should be able to get everything that I want.  Trust me, I learned at a very early age that not only do we not typically get what we want, but that it’s probably better for our moral character that we don’t.  If these records were simply limited editions (which they are, on top of being regionally exclusive), and they all sold out in a matter of minutes I could deal with that.  But being denied even the chance at getting them based purely on my geographic location is like kicking a wolfman in the nards when he’s down.

Hell, I’ve even been on the lucky end of this stick in the past having easy access to exclusives (like the Halloween Hot Wheels Ghostbusters Ecto-1 variants at my at-the-time local Kroger grocery stores) and I’ll be honest, it didn’t feel that great.  Being a collector I was acutely aware that there were a ton of people in other states that wanted those exclusives that didn’t have access to them.  I had to make the tough choice one year of either leaving these Hot Wheel toys on the store shelves, or buying them all up and sending them out to friends in other states for cost.  Sure, I got to feel good about making sure collectors that wanted the cars got them at an affordable price, but I also was put in the position of a scalper, keeping other local folks from being able to buy them. It just felt crummy all around.

Bottom line.  I’m a super fan of a cult film who already feels a little marginalized because there isn’t a whole of collectible merchandise available for said film.  I’m already scouring the internet for rare items to celebrate my love for the Monster Squad (from Japanese movie pamphlets to rare publicity photos from the film’s premier.)  So now, on top of that I have to basically be denied access to cool new collectibles, or choose to pay ridiculously inflated prices on eBay for those collectibles from the scalpers that will inevitably flood the market days after the release.  That is the environment that exclusivity breeds.  These records that sell for £12 at the UK shops will be bought up by bottom feeding scalpers that will turn around and sell them for upwards of £40 to £50 on eBay or the Amazon Marketplace.  The sad fact is that this is a trend that I do not see ending anytime soon.  The companies that release these exclusives are getting exactly what they want (which is selling through all of their product in a short window of time), so why would they change to a more fan-friendly model?

*UPDATE*

So, just as I figured two things happened.  First, the Wolfman Texas Frightmare variant was next to impossible to get for all the reasons stated above.  Not only was I unable to source a copy from the show by reaching out on social media, but the leftover copies were put online at Mondo and sold out in a few minutes.  I’m not saying I have a huge reach on social media mind you, but I have a decent number of contacts and I even had both the cover artist, Gary Pullin, and Andre Gower from Monster Squad retweeting my call for help to no avail.  Second, checking eBay only a week after these records started going on sale and we can already see scalpers reselling these Monster Squad releases for two to five times their suggested retail price!

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This is after just one week!  When folks start getting these records in hand I can almost guarantee that the Wolfman, Gillman, and Frankenstein variants are going to be selling for upwards of $100.  In fact…

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For a two-song, 7-inch single.  I’ve heard arguments for both sides of this exclusivity game, and both have their merits, but I just can’t believe that this is the best way to go about marketing niche products aimed at fans, to fans.  Again, I am a huge Monster Squad fan who is willing to drop the $60 plus shipping for the four variants, and yet, with cash in hand I am barred access from the get-go.  I mean, I’m looking at the list of things required to pick up a release like this (money, awareness of the releases, checking availability the moment they go on sale, connections in areas where the exclusive releases are going on sale, etc.) and I check every box.  Well, every box except the one that reads: “Willing to pay upwards of 700% the price to douchebags who want to price gouge because the item is exclusive.”  Screw that check box.  Like I said, these days it really sucks to be a collector.

What about you, where do you stand on exclusivity?  Is there something awesome about this marketing concept that I’m missing?

These Should Exist: The Robo Force Edition!

Well, I’m finally back from my winter hiatus and I have a lot of stuff I want to write about here at Branded in the coming year.  2016 marks my 10 year running this site and I’m kind of floored that I’m still loving it after all these years.  Hell, I’ve officially been writing about the 80s as long as that decade lasted and I still have a ton of articles in mind that I’d love to tackle.  Bottom line, I want to take a second to thank each and every person who has ever stopped by to read an article, leave a comment, or strike up a conversation on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook.  I’ve gotten a chance to meet a bunch of you at various conventions and live events, and there are still a lot of folks I’d love to say “Hi” to in person someday.  It’s been a crazy ride and it’s not even close to being over yet.

I wanted to ease my way back into writing articles so I thought this would be the perfect time to share another set of digital trading cards that I’ve been slowly working on over the last year.  Looking back to the beginning of this site, there was one 80s brand that came up a lot when I was fondly remembering obscure nostalgia from my childhood.  It’s a toy line that is a real underdog when it comes to under-loved properties, and one that has had a great resurgence over the past couple of years.  I’m talking about those loveable, hugable robots, Maxx Steele’s Robo Force!

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When I started designing these digital 80s trading cards I knew that I wanted to not only fill in the pop culture cards for sets based on TV shows and movies, I also wanted to create sets for other fun stuff like bands, book series and toy lines.  Robo Force was always right up there at the top of the list of sets I wanted to work on, not only because I have a lot of fondness for the line, but also because there is a lot of great artwork that really hasn’t been showcased.

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RoboForce_Combo_3     RoboForce_Combo_8

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I took this opportunity to scan the back of one of the packages that had some great art featuring all the characters from wave one of the toy line.  I also scanned in some of the book covers and took some fun screenshots from the one cartoon episode that was finally released on DVD this past year…

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RoboForce_Combo_6     RoboForce_Combo_7

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All in all, I had a blast working on this cards.  To beat a dead horse, I really wish that I could get these professionally printed up, but until I can make that happen I guess I’ll just have to be content in creating them.

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RoboForce_Combo_13     RoboForce_Combo_14

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RoboForce_Combo_16     RoboForce_Combo_17

This is also one of those sets where I had a hard time holding back when it came to the amount of cards I wanted to design.  Between trying to feature all of the characters, the great artwork from the books and screenshots from the DVD, if I had the time this set would have easily had 100 cards or more.  As it stands I tried to cap myself at 26 to keep it down to a manageable project.

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RoboForce_Combo_19     RoboForce_Combo_20

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I was really happy with how these turned out.  In fact, I’m toying around with the idea of making a second series that exclusively focuses on the animated special so that I can try my hand at putting together a set that is more in line with the Masters of the Universe cards that Topps did (complete with scene by scene breakdowns and speech bubbles added to all the screenshots.)  But we’ll see…

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Trapper Keeper, the Sophisticated School Supply

About a month ago my buddy Philip Reed over at BattleGrip.com send me a link to a vintage newspaper article about the introduction of Mead’s Trapper Keeper notebook system that was originally published in the Reading Eagle in December of 1982.

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I love getting pointed to or stumbling across articles like this that address cool, yet let’s be honest, rather mundane aspects of what it was like to be a kid in the 80s.  I mean I can just imagine what it was like in a household around the end of summer where a kid had been badgering their parents to get them that new orange Trapper Keeper with the badass Lamborghini  and sunglasses on it because they absolutely had to have it to do well in the coming school year.  At first the parents are balking at the idea, I mean the last thing that want to do is to shill out another $5 for an expansive notebook when they know for a fact that their kid lost three of those expansive newfangled mechanical pencils the year prior, and will probably go through three more this year.  But then after skimming through the paper one morning the father saw this piece about Mead’s new notebook system and they realized, hey, maybe there’s something too this…

Trapper Keeper - Reading Eagle - Dec - 12 - 1982

Granted, this short article by J. Earl Ruthardt is basically a glorified advertisement for Mead and it’s products, there are some fun bits in information in there for the 80s nostalgia enthusiast.  I mean, I assumed that the Trapper Keeper evolved from other Mead notebooks, but it was cool to learn that preceding the Trapper Keeper were two other products, The Mead Organizer and the Mead Data-Center (the latter of which sounds badass, though I’m sure it’s just a three ring binder with folders that fit inside.)  It was also neat to discover that the revolutionary design of the Trapper Keeper was crowd-sourced from surveys with kids all over the country where Mead could get an idea of the notebook woes students had to deal with on a daily basis.

I also think it’s interesting that the design alone was the biggest selling point initially since the graphic design of the folders back in 1982 was still the standard one-color outer folder with no embellishments for crazy 80s era imagery.  So if these were so popular that they were flying off shelves and selling out at stores across the country in 1982, I have to imagine that when they started slapping on airbrushed dolphins, photos of bounding kittens and the aforementioned Lamborghinis sales must have at least doubled.  20 million dollars in sales for a single type of school supply.  I think that means that at least 1 in every 4 kids in the country must have owned at least one in 1982.  Pretty crazy stuff.

And since I love showing off my vintage Trapper Keeper, here it is again…

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Pop Culture Cartography Revisited

Almost two years ago I dug through my books and piles of ephemera to gather together my collection of pop culture maps from all sorts of different fantasy and movie worlds including cartography from the Thundercats, Willow, Fraggle Rock, The Princess Bride, The Smurfs, Dark Crystal and of course my favorite, The Goonies.  Well, this past month I discovered that there are two different versions of the map from the Goonies.  Not only is there an actual map in the film that leads the way to One-Eyed Willie’s pirate treasure (which I have a pretty darn cool replica of hanging in Branded HQ), but there was also a rather rare piece of mail-away, ephemera that was offered by Hi-C back in 1985.

Scan courtesy of Dan Goodsell (the rad artist behind Mr. Toast!)

Called the Goonies Story Card Adventure Map, this mail-away freebie was a giant fold-out map that had a very unique way of presenting the various locations from the film as well as illustrating the plot at the same time.  This thing was gargantuan at almost 4 feet long and almost a foot high.

But before I dig into that I want to thank the gracious Dan Goodsell of the World of Mr. Toast for allowing me to showcase his scan of the above Hi-C can label.  I’m sure I’ve talked about this before, but there are a handful of seriously awesome folks like Dan who have spent considerable amounts of time and money procuring, collecting, and archiving rare ephemera.  On the face of it these digitized collections provide an unbelievable insight into packaging that is a priceless archive for graphic artists, not to mention acting as a visual connection that generations of people can connect over via our cultural shared nostalgia.  But these collections often hold clues and keys that unlock all sorts of other mysteries for fans of pop culture. When I first stumbled upon the Goonies Story Card Adventure Map I didn’t realize that there was more to the map.  But after doing some research and finding the awesome Hi-C scan of Dan’s I was able to fill in some of the gaps that I was looking for. Without these archives, or blogs and sites that freely share their collections of vintage scans it would be impossible to put the pieces of the past back together.  So again, I want to thank Dan for being a super cool dude and letting me share this piece from his collection.

So what is this Story Card Adventure Map that I’m so excited about?  Well, as part of the Goonies merchandising push back in 1985 Warner Bros. partnered with the Coca Cola Company to offer these free map and card sets either via a mail-away promotions on the cans of Hi-C, or from in-store displays.  If you snagged one of the foldout maps in the store you had to collect the story cards that were printed on the Hi-C juice can labels (see above), whereas if you mailed away for the map it was shipped complete with the 24 card set included.

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Between the cards and the flavor text on the map you can relive the plot of the film scene by scene, and location by location.  But even without the card set that map is really cool because it addresses one of the weird spatial mysteries presented in the film, which is where exactly these underground tunnels and caves are located in relation to the above ground landmarks in Astoria (or at least the Astoria presented in the film…)

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Unfortunately this map wasn’t designed to answer those spatial questions specifically, but because of the way that it’s laid out it hints at how a lot of the films locations are laid out and how they connect to each other.  Also, as a bonus bit of interesting area layout imagine all that space from the country club on the top left out to the Goondocks on the top right being covered in a newly constructed golf course. I’m guessing the 9th and 10th holes would have been located along the shore right where that neighborhood stands.  Stupid Troy and his dumb dad…

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Not only did this map generally reveal the location and proximity of landmarks in the film the included story cards and character bios on the back of the map also revealed other obscure details of the film like all of the characters full names.  Did you know that Data’s real name is Ricky Roper?  That Chunk’s last name was Cohen (which was also the actor’s actual last name, Jeff Cohen.)  That Andy was short for Andrea?  There’s also some more backstory revealed such as confirmation that Stef and Mouth dated for a bit before the film.  Or that at 13, Mikey is the youngest Goonie which puts the other three at, at least 14 and places all of them in the 8th grade most likely.

Do these details actually matter?  No, but they’re still cool bits of trivia for any diehard fan for sure.  As far as pop culture cartography goes, this map may have just taken the number spot as my favorite ever…

 

Peel Here & Scream, Day 31!

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We’ve finally arrived on the big day!  Happy Halloween everyone!  Hoping today is full of hayrides, haunted houses, trick-or-treating, carving pumpkins, Halloween parties, and all sorts of spooky merriment!  Me?  I’m going to kick pick one of the recipes out of the Vincent Price Cookbook, chill out and have a blast watching horror movies and handing out buckets of candy to kids this evening.

The last sticker for this countdown is a Mello Smello promo sticker given out at Circle K’s back in the 80s and feels like the perfect image to close out this season with…

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Again, hope everyone has a happy Halloween and thanks for stopping by Branded this month to check out all the vintage sticker fun.

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Peel Here & Scream, Day 30!

Peel_Here_Scream

Well, we’re just one day away from the big show, the 10th Halloween where I’ve been sharing creepy, spooky 80s era fun here at Branded in the 80s.  If there’s one thing I’m really grateful for when it comes to running this site it’s that it’s forced me to pay more attention to the little things that surround my favorite holiday.  Looking back, the 10 years that preceded Branded I feel like that era is just a blur where the Halloween-y celebrations were minimal at best and I wonder about how many cool things slipped by my radar during that time.  Ah well, maybe I’ll find out over the next 10 years when the folks start really waxing nostalgic over the late 90s and early 2000s.  I assume I’ll be a regular reader of the Branded in the Millennium website whenever someone starts that ;)

Now onto the stickers for today.  First up is this rather creepy sheet of stickers from Hallmark released back in 1982.  Even though the illustrations are on the cute and cuddly side, if you pay attention you’ll see that these stickers are a tad more intense than the fare that I’ve been sharing so far during the Countdown.  Take that vampire scarecrow for instance.  Instead of just posing with a cute black cat it looks like he’s about to attack it!  Or what about that spider that’s sizing up that bee that it’s about to devour?  Or those seriously frightened jack-o-lanterns, or that freaky ass tree monster!

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Alright, let’s bring the intensity down a notch with this sheet of stickers released by Paper Magic back around 1983-84.  The stand-outs for me on this sheet are the anthropomorphic potions in the witch’s cauldron (which are awesome in a scrubbing bubbles sort of way) and that ghostly duo that look like they’re one werewolf drummer away from an awesome band…

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Next up today are a couple of packs of Window Weirdos stickers released by the Sticker Store around 1980 or so.  I love these because they’re so sketchy, and the whole idea of peeking into the windows of a creepy house to see all the weird things living inside is genius!

hhhhh    gggggg

Last up today on this eve before Halloween is this small sheet of stickers that I haven’t been able to identify in terms of exact year or manufacturer.  I will say that I love the aesthetic and if I had to pinpoint it I’d guess these were released sometime between 1985-1987.  Also, Cowboy pumpkins for the win…

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Come back tomorrow for my final day of the 2015 Peel Here & Scream Countdown to Halloween!

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Peel Here & Scream, Day 29!

Peel_Here_ScreamFor today’s Peel Here & Scream I’m jumping in the haunted DeLorean and heading back to 1983 for these classic monster stickers from Hallmark.  Is that the most dapper werewolf you’ve every seen or what?!?

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I also dig that this sheet features the grim reaper.  He doesn’t get nearly enough play at Halloween if you ask me.  Also, dig the vamped out Bride of the monster on this sheet too.  Next up is a scratch-n-sniff pumpkin sheet also from Hallmark, though this time from 1984…

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Both of these sheets came complete with cut lines, so my assumption is that these were designed to be cut up and distributed as treats for Halloween.  Maybe proto Stick-R-Treats?

Anyway, there are only a couple days left, have you all got your plans in order for the big day?

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Peel Here & Scream, Day 28!

Peel_Here_ScreamWe’re getting down to the wire for this year’s Halloween season with just a handful of days left before our towns are besieged by tiny ghosts and goblins and we all get sick off of eating way too much candy.  I can’t wait to plant myself on the porch and hand out candy to a bunch of excited trick or treaters!  But enough about me, lets get to today’s stickers shares which is all about Hallmark Stick-R-Treats!

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Stick-R-Treats were sold in bags by Hallmark for folks to hand out in lieu of candy during Halloween from around 1983 to 1995 or so.  I didn’t get many as a kid, but I would have loved them in my pumpkin pail…

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Somewhere in my archive I also have a sheet of Gremlins stickers too.  I’ll have to update this post later with those…

**UPDATE**  Here’s that Gremlins sticker…

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