Tag Archives: 80s Cartoons

Peel Here 122: Filling in the gap of the Shirt Tales

4560287382_404990f06c_oIt’s kind of crazy, over the last 10 years I’ve collected, traded and sold so many 80s stickers that I often forget what I’ve already acquired or written about here at Branded.  Part of this is because so many of my stickers are sitting in stacks packed away in boxes (and have been for years) because I haven’t found a great way to store or display them.  Over the past few months I’ve been amassing a small collection of Hallmark Shirt Tales sticker sheets thinking that, that was a brand I had yet to write about.  When I sat down to put this Peel Here column together I surprised myself when I realized that I had already written about some Shirt Tales stickers almost 9 years ago.  Well, luckily, the sticker sheets I’ve been collecting did not overlap with what I’d written about before, so now I can fill in the gaps with some more vintage Shirt Tales stickers…

The Shirt Tales made their Hallmark debut back in 1980 as a series of greeting cards, stationary and stickers.  The characters were created by Janet Elizabeth Manco and featured a series of happy, rotund and super furry animals wearing multicolored t-shirts.  These shirts usually featured some sort of salutation or emotion, especially at the outset of the brand.  There were a bunch of different animal characters, none of which were named until later on when the cards became super popular and the company was grooming the brand for additional merchandising.  Of the original animals featured, only one, Rick Racoon, would be a stand out that would make it past the greeting cards and stickers on to the cartoon.  Here’s an example of one of the earliest sheets released in 1980…

shirttales 6

This one has a fun collection of animals including a walrus, koala, pig, rabbit, beaver, cat, monkey, and Rick the Raccoon up on the top right.  In this second sheet, you can see a progression of the art style on these critters from rotund/cutesy to slightly more realistic.  There’s also some new animals including a penguin, skunk, bear, and what I believe is a tiger at the bottom center, though I do not think this is considered Tyg.

1980 Shirt Tales stickers

A context clue for these characters is the copyright date underneath them.  These first three sheets were all released in 1980, and all of these characters were created that year.  Later on, when we get into the characters that male it onto the cartoon, you’ll notice that they retain their copyright date on the sticker sheets (so you’ll see a 1980 next to Rick for instance.)

shirttales 2

This fourth sheet has a continuation of the art style evolution as the characters are becoming more and more aligned with how they’d look in the eventual cartoon.  This sheet is also fun because the stickers were flocked and you could feel the fur on them.  This was released in 1981, and on it you’ll notice the introduction of three more of the permanent characters, Pammy (the panda), Bogey (the orangutan), and Tyg (the tiger.)

shirttales20

This next sheet finally transitions into the more or less final look for the Shirt Tales, as well as featuring the full main and final cast of characters that would see the brand make the jump from stationary to animation (with the inclusion of Digger the mole.)  This sheet was released in 1982…

shirttales 50

Also, I love the way they worked the rainbows into that one above. Especially Rick’s badass rainbow wing hat.  So this next one is a sheet of banana-scented Shirt Tales stickers from 1982.  Not sure how many other scents there were in this series…

shirttales 3

And the last new sheet I have is this next one which goes full on into the cartoon look and feel of the Shirt Tales up to and including their awesome car and treehouse!  Note that each of the characters have different copyright dates…

shirttales 4

Since I’m posting all these new sticker sheets I figured I might as well also include the two sheets I shared way back in 2007…

image

image

Last, but not least, this Halloween stick-r-treat sticker from sometime in 1982-83…

shirttales 7

There are probably like 6,000 other Shirt Tales sticker sheets that were released between 1980 and 1987 when the brand was active, but these are the nine I’ve been able to source.  I wonder if Hallmark has ever considered bringing this brand back?  Seems long overdue, and a quick search of the Hallmark site says, yes, yes it has started to make a comeback!

But Does it Hold Up?

It’s weird when you come to the realization that you’re getting older, especially when you’re a kid at heart. Sure, we all tick off each year with a birthday and we watch the holidays and seasons fly by, but as we run through our twenties and thirties, it’s hard not to continuously feel like a teenager.  I make plenty of jokes about being the grump out on the stoop shaking a toy lightsaber at the “youngins” barking at them to get off my lawn, but it wasn’t until the past few years when I really started to feel older.  It started with generally losing track of the music scene and who the comedians were on the cast of Saturday Night Live, but the next thing I knew I was walking out of the movie theater bitching about all the teens texting and how loud and ridiculously disorienting the film was.  Then at work I found myself explaining to my younger co-workers what 8-Trac and cassette tapes are, as well as describing what playing the original Nintendo Entertainment System was so much fun.  They couldn’t get past the fact that most games didn’t have save points or that you couldn’t respawn where your character bit the dust and that you’d have to play the whole level over again from scratch.  Long story short, I really began to start feeling old, like I was officially part of a generation removed that is no longer driving pop culture at all.

cassette1_3033301bI can totally accept that, but there are aspects to this shift in generation that bug me, and it’s not just feeling like I have to defend my pop culture to a younger generation, what really bothers me is having to defend it to my own. I get why the younger generation mocks the TV shows and cartoons that I grew up on, I mean I did the same thing to a certain extent with my parent’s pop culture.  It’s just a symptom of the changing of the guard.  But what really kills me is when folks my age look back to our shared pop culture experiences and they sneer and inevitably say the four words that really burrow under my skin in the worst way, “It Doesn’t Hold Up.”  This typically comes after I’ve been chatting with someone and I mention that I collect 80s era ephemera and cartoons on DVD.  I’ll bring up a series like the Silverhawks or Jem and they’re get really excited as they remember something that’s long been buried in their psyche.  “Oh, I used to love that show!” is what they say, followed by a promise to look it up on Netflix or Hulu.  Then, about a week or so later I’ll run into them again and there will be a weird hostility in their voice as they inform me that they watched a few episodes of that long forgotten cartoon and they were “sooooo disappointed…” because “It Didn’t Hold Up.”

thundercats-800

surprise

This always makes me wonder what exactly folks are expecting out of revisiting the pop culture of their youth. Are they expecting the shows to feel like they were written today, with current day ethics and attention spans taken into consideration?  Are they expecting there to be a layer of adult innuendo that they missed as a kid?  Or are they simply hoping that what made them excited, laugh or smile as a kid would still be the thing that hit them in the same place as an adult?  Honestly, it’s probably all three, and after realizing that the first two expectations didn’t pan out they’re disappointed (sometimes angrily so.)  This typically also leads to the ranking game, the “what were the best (fill in the blank) back in the day”, that also usually raises my hackles a little.  Don’t get me wrong.  I have no problem with folks ranking their favorite shows or movies, but it inevitably becomes a competition (well a perceived one at least) where I’m asked to make my list for comparison.  I hate being put in that position as it makes me feel defensive and weird if the other person has already decided something on my list “doesn’t hold up.”  Nostalgia is a celebration and an acknowledgement of the shared pop culture experience, it’s not a competition or a dick measuring contest.

0f3e54993dfc674b1c8a6dfd9eb51997

I think this also brings me back to an ideal that I try very hard to adhere to when writing for Branded, the idea that every cartoon, comic book, toy, live action show, sitcom, band, song and movie is someone’s favorite thing in the world.  Even the Mon Chi Chi’s Rubix the Amazing Cube, or the seasons of Diff’rent Strokes with Danny Cooksey.

untitled

I always try my best to invoke this perspective when I approach a subject, to put myself in the shoes of a superfan so that I can get to the heart of why something works or is cool.  In this online era of negativity with all the snark, butt-hurt expectations and angry backlash from fandom at the mere mention of re-launching a dormant brand for a new generation, I truly believe that I have to take the optimistic perspective and earn the right to bag on something.  I know it’s not popular to continuously play the optimist, but I’d rather sacrifice pageviews, comments, likes and followers for a more fun and upbeat nostalgia experience.  It’s not simply just a matter of “If you don’t have nothing nice to say…”, because I think there is a very important place for dissent, criticism, and anger.  But I do think that that perspective has to be earned or else it rings hollow, argumentative or baiting.

I guess this all leads me to a few questions.  Am I weird for not caring if a show or movie from my childhood “holds up” or not?  Does anyone think that today’s pop culture will hold up twenty years from now?  Have you ever been in a situation where you felt weird for loving a TV show or movie that everyone around you thought was stupid because it didn’t hold up for them?  If there is a show that doesn’t hold up for you, have you still been able to find any enjoyment revisiting it, or does it sort of become something that you divorce yourself from?

8-Bit Christmas is the Fruitcake of 80s Nostalgia Novels…

This is the first year in a long time when I’m doing my best to get into the holiday spirit for the Christmas season. For a good portion of my life Halloween has basically been my “Christmas”, and for all intents and purposes the period between November 1st through to January 1st is usually a time when I duck my head down and try and run as fast as I can through the rest of the year trying my best not to knock down any family and friends along the way. It’s a mixture of being burnt out after celebrating a month-long Halloween, and trying to fend off the insanity that comes with trying to find the perfect gifts, visiting with a modern fractured family and trying my best not to go broke in the process. But this year? I’m going all out by letting go of my worries and embracing the holiday.

So I was pretty stoked when I was approached by DB Press to take a look at the first novel from scriptwriter Kevin Jakubowski titled 8-Bit Christmas. Being described as “…A Christmas Story for the Nintendo generation…” (by author James Frey), 8-Bit Christmas tells the story of one kid’s epic quest of Super Mario Bros. proportions to secure a NES for Christmas. Amidst flaming wreaths, speeding minivans, lost retainers, fake Santas, hot teachers, snotty sisters, “Super Bowl Shuffles” and one very naked Cabbage Patch Kid, Kevin’s book vividly weaves a nostalgic tale of Christmas magic and 8-bit glory. Honestly this book being touted as packed with 80s era Christmas nostalgia sounded like just what I needed to kick off my own attempt to embrace the holiday again.

8-bit christmas

First and foremost, 8-Bit Christmas delivers on the nostalgia. Set in the late 80s and centering on Jake Doyle, a nine year-old who covets a neighbor’s NES to the extent where it borders on single-minded stalker-level obsession, the book makes reference to practically every major pop culture aspects from the decade. The Super Bowl Shuffle, baseball card collecting, Showbiz pizza and the Rock-Afire Explosion, the Pizza Hut Book It program, KangaRoos zipper pocket shoes, Max Headroom, Members Only Jackets, Moon Boots, as well as a litany of bands, cartoons, movies, TV shows, and toys way too numerous to name. Karate Kid references? Yup, there’s more than the entire Cobra Kai can battle. Star Wars? G.I. Joe? Transformers? Go Bots? Strawberry Shortcake? Cabbage Patch Kids? Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes. Much like Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One before it, the novel is an outlet to celebrate all of the stuff we 30-Somethings loved so much about our 80s childhoods, and all of our hyper-collective shared experiences. If there’s one thing our generation does well, it’s bonding over the insane level of pop culture awareness and merchandising from that decade. Jakubowski does an admirable job of shoehorning in so many references, and touching on so many aspects of what it was like being a kid during that time that I’d be hard-pressed to imagine any rock he left unturned. Well, he does skip over the mentioning branded lunchboxes when comparing and contrasting packed lunches versus buying the hot tray at school. Is every reference accurate and researched? No. He fudges release dates (mentioning the Karate Kid cartoon as a favorite even though it didn’t debut until a year after the winter of ’88 when the book is set) and mashes together experiences (like listing cartoons that only aired during the after school animation blocks or on cable like Inspector Gadget, Transformers and G.I. Joe as Saturday Morning cartoons.) But when you consider the sheer volume of nostalgic references, nit picking the errors and decade blending is pretty pointless.

8-bit christmas 2

Where the book sort of falls apart for me can be summed up by James Frey’s pull quote from above which evokes the film A Christmas Story; Jakubowski doesn’t just shoot for ACS‘s tone, he basically uses it as a point-for-point outline. Whether it’s aping the aged and slightly sarcastic narration of the main character reflecting on his youth, the plot device of a kid yearning for that one specific Christmas gift and then dealing with parents that basically tell him he’ll shoot his eye out with the NES Zapper, being forced to wear an item of goofy, girly clothing, reminiscing over the old man’s curmudgeonly ways, dealing with an annoying and whiny younger sibling, battling the town bully, or using the exact turn of phrases that seem uniquely in the voice of A Christmas Story, the book starts to feel a little hollow when you get past 80s homages. This is amp-ed up by a sort of ridiculous conceit that in 1988 only one kid in an entire Illinois county has a Nintendo Entertainment System, and only because his parents are filthy stinking rich. Having grown up in a decidedly middle class family with plenty of friends on both sides of the financial spectrum, I’m having a hard time remembering many kids who DIDN’T have an NES. Amp the story up even further with a Footloose-level county-wide ban on both owning AND selling Nintendo after the system is blamed for the accidental death of a yappy dog and all the reader is left being able to relate to is the plethora of 80s references. I think the problem lies with Jakubowski slavishly relying on A Christmas Story for inspiration. He riffs on Ralphie’s obsessive daydreams in that film as a jumping off point to tell Jake Doyle’s story, but forgets that with the exception of an all out attack by a pack of wild neighbor dogs on the family’s beloved turkey and an outlandishly sexualized leg lamp, that film is pretty firmly grounded in a very believable reality. 8-Bit Christmas has its head in the clouds and packs the book so full of wacky adventures in addition to Doyle’s Nintendo obsessed daydreams, that for me it was hard to relate to the story. As a film it would probably be easier to get behind, with only an hour and a half’s investment, but spending 8 or so hours reading a book it just sort of left me a little cold. It also doesn’t help that the singular obsession with obtaining an NES overshadows most if not all of the Christmas spirit in the book. I won’t spoil the ending, but I will say that instead of helping me get into the mood the book kind of reinforced a lot of insanity I’ve been trying to avoid for the past 15 years.

When all is said and done, even though the story didn’t resonate with me as much as I’d hoped, I can’t help but recommend 8-Bit Christmas purely on the richness of the 80s pop culture experience. There are enough obscure observations to balance the obvious references and that alone makes the book a worthwhile read.  It’s so literally heavy and densely packed, it’s like the fruitcake of 80s nostalgia novels…

My Beastmen…

Sometimes I have to remind myself that not every post has to be something precious where I do a bunch of research and try and dig into my memories of the 80s.  Sometimes I can just throw up a picture of my Beastmen…

31 Days of Monsters, Days 16 & 17: Cute Little Gobllins and one ugly Gorgon!

Alright, with today’s two monster animation cels I’ve finally gotten caught up on my 31 Days of Monsters Countdown!  These cover days 16 & 17, and once again features creatures from both the Filmation and Real Ghostbusters cartoons.  First up is this cel/production photocopy background from the Filmation show featuring the main gorgon herself, Medusa!

Unfortunately Eddie Spencer, Jr. is part of the photocopy in this image, but it does go really well paired with the Medusa cel (and seeing as how he’s holding up a mirror I can pretty safely assume that this is an accurate background image.)

Though it would have been nice to get a cel that showed her full face, I’m going to go ahead and make the claim that I didn’t want to inadvertently turn any Branded readers into stone.  Yeah, that’s the ticket (said in my best imitation of Jon Lovitz…)

Next up we have this cute little guy from the Real Ghostbusters cartoon…

Unfortunately I can’t quite place this character from a specific episode at the moment.  I’ve been watching so many episodes lately that my brain is becoming fried and resembles a ghost trap after it’s just slammed shut and is still smoking…

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.

31 Days of Monsters, Days 14 & 15: Of Witches and Brat-A-Rats!

Still playing catch-up this week, so I have another double feature of monster animation cels to share today.  Being the 16th, we’re officially at the halfway point of the season, a time to start making those last minute costume plans and to start looking for sales on jumbo bags of candy to hand out to the kids!  Also, I’ve gone though the responses to the Monster Cereal Prints Scavenger Hunt Contest, and will be sending out notices to the winners via e-mail.  Thanks again to Manny Galán of Cartoon Lagoon Studios for the prize packs and remember that you still have a chance to win a set of these awesome prints (signed by Galán and the voice actors of the Monsters) by heading over to the Strange Kids Club and submitting your very own cereal monster creation!

Back to the monster animation cels though, first up today we have this fun piece from the Filmation Ghostbusters cartoon featuring the whimpering yes-man to mail baddy Prime Evil, Brat-A-Rat!

Voiced by Peter Cullen, Brat-A-Rat is a weird, alien, bat-rat-lizard creature with the ability to levitate.  He’s is to Prime Evil, sort of what Salacious Crumb is like to Jabba the Hut in the Star Wars universe, and ends up tattling on the other ghosts as well as dishing out some of PE’s punishments for failure.  He always reminded me of having a sort of Don Bluth-inspired character design, which is probably why I’m so fond of him…

Next up in today’s double feature we have our second evil Witch of the countdown, Kestrel, who hails from the season five Real Ghostbusters episode “If I Were a Witch Man”, circa 1989…

In the episode Kestrel, a witch imprisoned in a crystal ball by Puritans during the late 1600s, gets free and begins looking for revenge in modern day Lewison (which just happens to be the ancestral town of the Spenglers!)  Kestrel possesses the body of Margaret Prandish, the headmistress of a local girl’s academy that was built upon the Elron Witchcraft Altar where Kestrel was held captive in the crystal ball for centuries.  The above cel has the in-between form that is a mixture of Kestrel and Prandish, and it’s pretty freaky to boot!

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.

31 Days of Monsters, Day 12 & 13: Raul Julia would have made a lovely Bello Micawb…

Ack! I’m so unprepared for this year’s countdown, but it hasn’t hindered me from enjoying the heck out of the season thus far.  Though I missed a couple days this past weekend, I’m not going to sweat it.  I’ll just double up on some stuff as we enter day 15, the half-way point on the countdown this year!  So today I have two spooks to share (well one spook and one creepy dude.)  The first animation cel is of the Addams-Family-inspired character Mr. Bello Micawb (pronounced like “macabre”) from the Real Ghostbusters episode Loathe Thy Neighbor which debuted in November of 1987…

Bello, the patriarch of the Micawb family, is sort of the Gomez Addams/Herman Munster of the family (though he leans much more towards Gomez in design and in the voice acting.)  The episode is one of my favorites, which doesn’t surprise me as Michael Reeves was the main writer listed.  From what I’ve found during my 80s cartoon explorations, Reeves tends to be responsible for some of the better episodes of all the series he wrote for.

The second creature I have today is this adorable purple brute from Filmation’s Ghostbusters episode, The Battle for Ghost Command…

Again, though this fellow came with a production photocopy background, it’s not from the same scene as the actual animation cel I acquired.  As you can see from the below screenshots, I managed to snag a cel that has this grape-colored fur monster right in mid-snack in an alleyway…

  

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.

31 Days of Monsters, Day 11: Deadtime Synergy!

It’s day eleven of the countdown and unfortunately I have another Real Ghostbusters animation cel that I haven’t been able to place in a specific episode.  Sometimes I wonder if I watch too many cartoons to a point where these things get so scrambled in my brain that it’s hard to remember anything.  Anyway, what drew me to this one was that for one, it was a woman (rare on my past Monster countdowns), and two she sort of brought the idea of a zombie Jem to mind.  Granted, she’s not as awesome as this zombie Jem by Christopher Tupa, but still, I like toying with the idea…

Actually, she kind of looks like a cross between Jem and Zombie Geena Davis from the end sequence of Beetlejuice now that I think about it (just without the wedding dress…)

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.

31 Days of Monsters, Day 10: Scared Stiff, er, uh, he’s actually kind of scared melty here…

We’re all the way up to day 10 of the countdown, and one-third of the way though the month of October already.  It seems like the days take forever to pass during September, but once we hit October it just flies by.  Anyway, today I present another Filmation Ghostbusters animation cel, another featuring one of Prime Evil’s main henchmen, the robot ghost Scared Stiff!

Scared Stiff is basically the evil ghost equivalent of C3-P0 from Star Wars, though just as bumbling, harmless and ready to fall apart at the seams during times of stress.  His place is more for comic relief in the series, but as a kid I still enjoyed watching him, especially when he was “destroyed” by the other villains in the show.

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.

31 Days of Monsters, Day 9: Twinkie’s Witch

Day nine brings us our first witch of the countdown (there should be at least two more coming), and I believe the first witch animation cel overall on Branded.  This character didn’t have a name in the series as the episode she hails from, Kitty-Cornered, it one of the more Slimer-centric later season 5 mini-episodes…

She’s referred to as Twinkie’s Witch as she’s the owner of a wish-granting cat named Twinkie who in the episodes is knocked off the witch’s broom and lands on Slimer.  The spud then proceeds to have his wishes granted causing havoc in the firehouse while the Witch looks frantically for her cat.

When I procured this animation cel I ended up receiving a number of tandem cels that feature the witch flying around what I assume is the corner of a building.  Most of the cels were pretty sparse, only featuring her hand or are from her head up (sort of like that Simpsons episode where Bart gets the Scratchy cel with only the floating arm.)  But along with the cels I also received a number of fuller production drawings including the one below featuring the witch noticing that it was snowing around the firehouse…

 

So come back each day this month for a new monster animation cel, and also, for more Halloween-y fun all month long, be sure to check out the Countdown to Halloween website for the complete list of sites participating in this year’s spooky fun.  John Rozum has been working hard compiling the list, and it looks like there is a lot of awesome sites already signed up.